Recent Changes

Wednesday, January 16

  1. page educational technology taxonomies edited ... Weakness - what happens if the system has an error and it is not fixed in time to still allow …
    ...
    Weakness - what happens if the system has an error and it is not fixed in time to still allow the assignment to be meaningful to students
    Communication-with other students, teachers, experts in various fields, and people around the world
    ...
    and the thridthird person will
    ...
    a positive exeperienceexperience
    Bulletin boards
    Computer conferences
    ...
    Strength - allow students an outlet for creative expression
    Weakness - Time consuming to teach students how to use the technology
    Overall:
    Strengths:
    Overall Strengths:
    Learner centered
    Based on children's natural impulses as proposed by Dewey
    ...
    Programs could be costly to the district
    Who decides which technologies are the best to use?
    Media for communication uses BlackBoard as an example. Sometimes students may experience a glitch and have to wait to tell the instructor who informs tech support and the wait could be long to get the issue resolved.
    Recommendations:
    Recommendations:
    This taxonomy seems to take multiple factors into consideration. While it does focus on computer based technologies, it offers room for newer technologies to fit into the already defined categories. The most beneficial part of using this taxonomy is that it is from the learner’s perspective. This taxonomy would be beneficial to a teacher looking to balance their instruction with multiple types of media.
    Some of the technologies require internet access. Availability may be limited for some students.
    ...
    Who decides which technologies are the best to use?
    Media for communication uses BlackBoard as an example. Sometimes students may experience a glitch and have to wait to tell the instructor who informs tech support and the wait could be long to get the issue resolved.
    Recommendations:
    This taxonomy seems to take multiple factors into consideration. While it does focus on computer based technologies, it offers room for newer technologies to fit into the already defined categories. The most beneficial part of using this taxonomy is that it is from the learner’s perspective. This taxonomy would be beneficial to a teacher looking to balance their instruction with multiple types of media.

    3. David Wiley - Connecting learning to instructional design theory. [Team #2 - T. Bennett-Clare, G. Holstege & A. Rutenbar]
    ...
    David Wiley titled " Connecting learning objects to instructional design theory: A definition, a metaphor, and a taxonomy" is an article that is intended
    ...
    concepts called learning objects."learning objects." It was
    Strengths: Reusable learning objects, which are often found in the form of technology/media, can be reused in different learning contexts
    Promotes the use of multiple technology resources
    ...
    No explanation of learning objects’ role in the evaluation process
    Complex and unfamiliar terminology
    All in all,Recommendation: we felt
    4. C. Bonk - Blended learning environments.[Team #3 - J. Bowen, K. Meyering, & C. Thomas]
    Blended learning more about the delivery or the method of teaching rather than a taxonomy. A common name that some of you may be used to would be 'hybrid learning'. Students are at school for face-to-face time with teacher but then leave the traditional school setting and do some learning on their own--normally from laptops. Technology is a huge issue for blended learning environments because the student must have access to the internet and whatever online programs that they are to use. In conjunction with technology, financial concerns are obvious. K-12 education has never been lower-funded, and schools having access to unlimited technology for blended learning situations would be unheard of.
    One concern with blended learning is the social presence aspect. I've learned that this is important and necessary when teaching in a blended or online format. I recommend the following article to learn about this subject.
    ...
    30(1), 157-70. Retrieved January 27, 2010, from Education
    For teaching teachers to evaluate instructional media and perform website evaluation, I believe blended learning would be successful, as these teachers must be interested in technology to be pursuing this line of education.
    Brief History:
    ...
    Research and information fluency - does the media or website support gathering, evaluating and using information? does it support organization, evaluation, synthesis, etc. of information? does it provide digital tools to support these functions? Strength - could be product specific, but not generic or widespread in many media products. For websites, might incorporate digital or information literacy elements and promote safe, ethical and legal use of media by others. Weaknesses - with the variety of different digital literacy and 21st century literacy standards or benchmarks, would be difficult to select one or support more than one. Could also be a site or product for evaluation or consideration of copyright and ethical use by students without an explicit function or support provided - i.e., Bogus websites.
    Thinking, problem solving and decision making - does the media or website support identifying and solving authentic problems or significant questions for investigation? does it support planning and managing activities to identify solutions and make informed decisions? does it support or promote divers perspectives and alternative solutions? Strength - provides an important, perhaps essential, aspect of student use of technology and 21st century or digital literacy standards. Weaknesses - difficult to integrate this into a product or website, per se, and perhaps should be incorporated into technology-based instructional activities and assessments rather than part of the product or site.
    ...
    to Expression. Item
    Item
    #5 might
    5. Digital citizenship - does the media or website support or exemplify human, cultural and societal issues related to using technology? Does it promote legal and ethical uses of technology or media - copyright, privacy, equity, etc? Does it promote lifelong learning? Does it incorporate or promote digital literacy? Strength - perhaps aligned with 21st century literacy, which is becoming a focus of standards & assessments in K-12 education. Weaknesses - some possible overlap with research and information literacy and as indicated above, might be better served if incorporated into a technology-based activity.
    Strengths of using this taxonomy for categorizing instructional media or websites: some power in four of the five categories, but might also be better if incorporated into technology-based activities, and alignment with national educational technology standards for students (NETS-S).
    (view changes)
    11:46 am

Monday, September 10

  1. 7:22 am

Monday, July 30

  1. page High School (11-12) edited ... Colossian Forum Trailer from The Colossian Forum on Vimeo. Also if you want to show students …
    ...
    Colossian Forum Trailer from The Colossian Forum on Vimeo.
    Also if you want to show students a thoughtful and fairly conservative group of Christians that believe evolution is a good theory you can find a huge amount of material at Biologos.
    Posted by Larry Borst
    Assessments
    Formative Assesment Tools:
    Our school uses LanSchool software to monitor students, but we can also use it to quickly assess student knowledge through their student response system. Other similar tools that we could use include the aforementioned Socrative. What we like about Socrative is that there is an iPad and Android app that we can use in class. Since our school is moving toward iPads as teaching tools, this app makes the student response system more intuitive.
    In our Moodle classrooms, we assess student comprehension through the online discussion board.
    Summative Assessment Tools:
    For our end-of-unit tests and quizzes we make use of the quizzes within Moodle. The quizzes provide many advantages. First, the quiz can automatically shuffle the order of questions and even the order of responses in a multiple choice question. For the student, being able to see immediate results from their multiple choice questions provides an opportunity for the student to learn from their misunderstandings. From our perspective as teachers, it is nice to be able to grade the short answer/essays one question at a time. Lastly, the quizzes can be set up to allow the students to retake a test or quiz.
    Any project, presentation, debate, etc. we like to create a rubric so the student knows what he is being graded on. Rubistar is a nice website to create customized rubrics that can be printed or stored online. The rubrics can also be used for students to evaluate themselves or the perspectives of others.
    Posted by Tim Stapert and Larry Borst

    (view changes)
    9:49 am
  2. page High School (11-12) edited ... posted by Tim Stapert Subject: Religion, Bible, and Theology This topic Religion tends to…
    ...
    posted by Tim Stapert
    Subject: Religion, Bible, and Theology
    This topicReligion tends to
    1. At some point in each class the issue of homosexuality will come up since it is such a hot topic. Rather than start talking about this and creating more anger and heat than discussion I have found that allowing students to watch Tony Campolo debate this issue with his wife, Peggy Campolo. Watching a couple debate this while remaining civil (and married) allows students to explore options in the debate rather than jump to angry conclusion first.
    2. Since we are on the topic of hot topics, evolution is one that creates more heat than light. Here I have found two sites helpful, first the Colossian Forum is a group that seeks to find meaningful dialogue rather than angry polarization. They have an excellent introductory video and other excellent materials for anyone interested.
    (view changes)
    9:03 am
  3. page High School (11-12) edited ... Subject: Religion, Bible, and Theology This topic tends to be polarizing and anything found o…
    ...
    Subject: Religion, Bible, and Theology
    This topic tends to be polarizing and anything found on the web tends to reflect this polarization. As students advance in their understanding they are encouraged to look for and evaluate some of the sites that are so polar or angry but before that it is useful to find thoughtful expressions of Christianity and seek to build bridges or at least have a civil conversation. To this end I have found these sites worthy of note:
    ...
    conclusion first.
    2. Since we are on the topic of hot topics, evolution is one that creates more heat than light. Here I have found two sites helpful, first the Colossian Forum is a group that seeks to find meaningful dialogue rather than angry polarization. They have an excellent introductory video and other excellent materials for anyone interested.
    Colossian Forum Trailer from The Colossian Forum on Vimeo.
    Also if you want to show students a thoughtful and fairly conservative group of Christians that believe evolution is a good theory you can find a huge amount of material at Biologos.

    (view changes)
    9:02 am
  4. page High School (11-12) edited ... I generally upload my videos to YouTube and link them on our class site. But YouTube has recen…
    ...
    I generally upload my videos to YouTube and link them on our class site. But YouTube has recently offered a new feature that allows you to blur faces. If you or your administration has been concerned about putting videos of, say, a lab experiment that shows students' faces. Now you can quickly and easily blur those faces. Check out how here.
    posted by Tim Stapert
    Subject: Religion, Bible, and Theology
    This topic tends to be polarizing and anything found on the web tends to reflect this polarization. As students advance in their understanding they are encouraged to look for and evaluate some of the sites that are so polar or angry but before that it is useful to find thoughtful expressions of Christianity and seek to build bridges or at least have a civil conversation. To this end I have found these sites worthy of note:
    1. At some point in each class the issue of homosexuality will come up since it is such a hot topic. Rather than start talking about this and creating more anger and heat than discussion I have found that allowing students to watch Tony Campolo debate this issue with his wife, Peggy Campolo. Watching a couple debate this while remaining civil (and married) allows students to explore options in the debate rather than jump to angry conclusion first.

    (view changes)
    8:48 am

Saturday, July 28

  1. page High School (11-12) edited ... Again, for science people, nasa.gov has a ton of great interactive online resources. One page …
    ...
    Again, for science people, nasa.gov has a ton of great interactive online resources. One page in particular (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Experiments/index.php) has a few great lesson ideas using live satellite imagery. I'm planning on using this imagery to study water and air quality in different parts of the world.
    Another fun earth science site (sorry most of my resources are science-related!) is Planet Diary. It houses a huge variety of activities about earth's various spheres (ex. hydrosphere) that utilize online resources.
    I'm also planning on using Google Earth for my environmental science class to look at satellite images of different areas. It might also be useful in a social studies class when comparing different geographical areas. There are a lot of neat (free) features, and it's really easy to download.
    Stealing from Dan, I feel that all of these resources meet the NET Standard of "Research and Information Fluency" (students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information).
    Assessment Tool Ideas:
    (view changes)
    9:18 am
  2. page High School (9-10) edited ... {https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/neVKuZG6LmngJwP9gk314nNB9A3uQp-6RFFJMgvyag0TzPXda7qG5qNiMFW…
    ...
    {https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/neVKuZG6LmngJwP9gk314nNB9A3uQp-6RFFJMgvyag0TzPXda7qG5qNiMFWqPc276iBrcq5xN_Y=w150-h150}
    One of the biggest challenges in having students write mathematics using technology is the lack of a good (heck adequate) free equation editor. Microsoft Office probably has one of the best (IMHO) but not every student can afford to purchase Office not to mention the upgrade for the newest version every year or so. Hats off to Google for improving their equation editor in Docs over the past year or so but it still did not compete with Office. Then the clouds parted, the angels sang and butterflies fluttered. Daum Equation Editor is a free App that is available in the Chrome Web Store and the Mac App Store. It is by far the best free, easy to use, easy to export equation editor that I've found. I have not found a way to do copy and paste, but you can save the equation as a picture and import that into all the Google Drive (document, presentation), Microsoft Word & PowerPoint, Prezi, and Evernote.
    ...
    (I think). Thanks!
    {http://evernote.com/media/img/logo.png} Evernote logo
    I would like to have students begin to use Evernote to compile their notes and activities that we do. Kind of making an e-folio for all of their mathematics. I'm not sure how all the logistics of this would work out, especially if they don't have a device to take the notes with. I envision them not having to worry about lost or missing notes and assignments for my class and they would end up with a "library" of their work in math throughout high school. One of the other hurdles to overcome was how do I get kids to be able to type equations? The app I listed above takes care of that. The Daum Equation Editor will allow them to copy a picture of their equation(s) into their notes along with any hyperlinks of the demonstrations or videos I've created.
    (view changes)
    7:04 am

Friday, July 27

  1. page High School (11-12) edited ... Tinychat is a synchronous chat site that seems really easy to use. You create a "chatroom…
    ...
    Tinychat is a synchronous chat site that seems really easy to use. You create a "chatroom" that can be as private or public as you choose. Students can enter the chat room from a link to text message, talk with a mic, or even talk using a webcam. could use this to be available to students for a review session, or even introduce the resource for my students to use when working on a group project.
    Again, for science people, nasa.gov has a ton of great interactive online resources. One page in particular (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Experiments/index.php) has a few great lesson ideas using live satellite imagery. I'm planning on using this imagery to study water and air quality in different parts of the world.
    Another fun earth science site (sorry most of my resources are science-related!) is Planet Diary. It houses a huge variety of activities about earth's various spheres (ex. hydrosphere) that utilize online resources.
    Stealing from Dan, I feel that all of these resources meet the NET Standard of "Research and Information Fluency" (students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information).
    Assessment Tool Ideas:
    (view changes)
    2:48 pm
  2. page High School (11-12) edited ... It seems like this would be a great way to study famous scientists/discoveries! Thanks! poste…
    ...
    It seems like this would be a great way to study famous scientists/discoveries! Thanks!
    posted by Matt Oeverman
    Stephanie Slotsema
    Instruction Tool Ideas:

    {Earth Labs.png}
    For you earth/life science people, check out Earth Labs. The Science Education Resource Center at Carleton College created interactive lessons for teachers and students (site includes both teacher plans and student versions for each lesson). These lessons sequence videos, interactive satellite images, scientific data, interactive CNN news articles, hands-on activities, and various levels of questioning. Topics include: biomes, earth systems, meteorology, fisheries, and natural disasters.
    postedI also love love love Khan Academy. Dan talked about it earlier. It has an amazing number of informational videos on zillions of topics from basic scientific concepts to calculus problems to civics lesson to art history eras. I used these videos as extra resources for my chemistry students last year. I posted a few videos for each of our units, to give students some options (other than their textbook) to find information.
    Tinychat is a synchronous chat site that seems really easy to use. You create a "chatroom" that can be as private or public as you choose. Students can enter the chat room from a link to text message, talk with a mic, or even talk using a webcam. could use this to be available to students for a review session, or even introduce the resource for my students to use when working on a group project.
    Again, for science people, nasa.gov has a ton of great interactive online resources. One page in particular (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Experiments/index.php) has a few great lesson ideas using live satellite imagery. I'm planning on using this imagery to study water and air quality in different parts of the world.
    Stealing from Dan, I feel that all of these resources meet the NET Standard of "Research and Information Fluency" (students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information).
    Assessment Tool Ideas:
    I'm planning on relying on Moodle when it comes to casual assessment. Each unit, my students will be given questions to guide their learning, found and submitted on Moodle. Students will also be asked to respond to articles via a Moodle forum. I'm also planning on playing around with Moodle quizzes, which can be made
    by Stephanie Slotsemauploading multiple choice questions from an online textbook database. I don't think I would use it as a summative assessment, but more as a formative assessment to see whether or not my students are ready for a test and/or ready to move on.
    ECONOMICS AND ONLINE TEXTBOOKS
    In looking for an online textbook for my Economics class, I came across this Wiki which has a list of potential economics textbooks as well as a list of lists of textbooks. I personally liked the Micro and Macroeconomics by John Petroff available through the Professional Educational Organization International (PEOI). They are designed as a very concise review of economics rather than as a full course book which will work well as a supplement to my class. I have not had a chance to check out all the textbooks, but there are certainly an abundance to choose from.
    (view changes)
    2:31 pm

More